Articles

Changes Coming to 2019-2020 Georgia Dove Season

Changes Coming to 2019-2020 Georgia Dove Season

DNR News, Small Game Hunting
Planning ahead for dove season? The 2019–2020 migratory bird season hunting dates and regulations, which includes doves, were recently approved by the Board of Natural Resources. Doves are a federally regulated migratory bird. As such, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service annually establishes a framework (opening and closing dates, maximum season length, and maximum bag limits) within which the states must set their seasons. These frameworks are developed with input of state wildlife agencies, and are informed using biological population, harvest, and habitat data. Recent framework changes to the maximum closing date for doves allows Georgia to adjust its dove season responsive to public desires. “For years our dove hunters have expressed a desire to end the dove season later,” said John Bowers, Chief of the Game Management Section of…
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GA Hunting Podcast #00 – Introduction to the New Podcast and Its Host

GA Hunting Podcast #00 – Introduction to the New Podcast and Its Host

Podcast
In this very first episode of the Georgia Afield Hunting Podcast, I'll be introducing you to the podcast format, what's to come, and tell you a little bit of background about myself. I'll also finish out the episode by revealing who our first guest will be on the first actual official episode coming up next week. If you enjoy the podcast or think you will, please subscribe to us on iTunes or your favorite podcast platform (links below). Also, we would greatly appreciate any positive reviews on those same platforms! If  you have any suggestions for podcast topics or guests, shoot me an email or join us at the Georgia Deer Hunting Facebook group. Listen Now  Or Listen to the Podcast at: Georgia Afield Hunting Podcast on iTunes Georgia…
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Official 2019-2020 Georgia Deer Season Dates

Official 2019-2020 Georgia Deer Season Dates

Georgia Deer Hunting
On May 21, the Georgia DNR Board approved the proposed regulations and season dates for Georgia's 2019-2020 deer season. The overall season structure remains the same as last season, with just the normal shift in dates so that all season openers fall on their respective Saturdays. The only big proposed changes were the addition of Bibb, Chatham, Clarke and Henry to the list of counties with an extended archery season, along with several changes to the either-sex dates for some counties. Those approved either-sex dates can be seen below. Always remember to consult with the latest official Georgia Hunting Regulations before heading afield. Those can be found at Georgia's Wildlife Resources Division homepage. Official Georgia Deer Season Dates [table id=33 /] Twelve (12) per season, Statewide. No more than ten…
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5 Great Podcasts for the Southern Hunter

5 Great Podcasts for the Southern Hunter

Brian's Blog
I have to admit, I was a late adopter of the whole podcasting craze. While I enjoy reading about hunting and watching a good hunt, the thought of listening to guys just talk about hunting didn’t appeal to me. But like a lot of things in life, I gave it a try and was surprised to find that I really enjoyed them -- well most of them, anyways. I started off with some of the popular national hunting podcasts, and soon found myself seeking out podcasts that spoke more to my specific interests: hunting public land and, more specifically, hunting in the South.  And while there isn’t an overabundance of hunting podcasts with a southern flair, there are several I listen to on a regular basis that I would highly…
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Georgia Turkey Season Update – 5/5/2019

Georgia Turkey Season Update – 5/5/2019

Georgia Turkey Hunting
With less than two weeks left in Georgia's turkey season, are you wondering how hunters have done in your county or on your favorite WMA? Below is a breakdown of reported harvests in each of Georgia's 159 counties, as well as on all of Georgia's public lands open to turkey hunting. Right now, the top three counties for turkey harvest are Polk (231), Floyd (223), and Bartow (219), and the top three public land tracts are the Chattahoochee National Forest (228), Paulding Forest WMA (55), and Fort Steward (50). How has your turkey season been? Has the action better or worse than last season? Feel free to discuss the results from your favorite WMA in the comments section below or in our Georgia Turkey Hunting Facebook group. Private Land Turkey…
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Does Prescribed Fire Negatively Impact Turkey Nesting?

Does Prescribed Fire Negatively Impact Turkey Nesting?

Georgia Turkey Hunting
There's been a lot of talk recently about whether prescribed fire, particularly those conducted by the DNR on wildlife management areas, is having a negative impact on turkey populations. Most of these talks have simply been based on assumptions and speculation. Recently, however, there was a post on Facebook by University of Georgia professor Michael Chamberlain — who spends his days studying the wild turkey — that discussed these potential impacts using actual scientific research. Michael graciously gave me the okay to share that post in this article, and I have done so below. If you're a turkey hunter, I encourage you to follow Michael on his Instagram and Twitter accounts, as he regularly shares interesting facts on the biology and behavior of wild turkeys. "Ok, this will be a…
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Will Social Media Be The Death of Hunting?

Will Social Media Be The Death of Hunting?

Brian's Blog
  Approximately 6 percent of the U.S. population hunts. To a lifelong hunter who’s worked hard to pass the tradition on to my children, that statistic is frightening. It should be frightening to you as well. We like to think of hunting as a God-given right but, in reality, it isn’t. Like it or not, our hunting heritage ultimately lies in the hands of the remaining 94 percent of the population that does not hunt. Fortunately for us, the vast majority of those non-hunters approve of hunting, as long as you don’t start throwing the word “trophy” around. But as hunter numbers continue to dwindle, can we keep that level of support? Social media has given us a great platform to unite and spread the positive message of hunters as…
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Georgia Turkey Season Update – 4/14/2019

Georgia Turkey Season Update – 4/14/2019

Georgia Turkey Hunting
Wondering how Georgia turkey hunters are doing in your county or on your favorite WMA this turkey season? Below is a breakdown of reported harvests in each of Georgia's 159 counties, as well as on all of Georgia's public lands open to turkey hunting. Right now, the top three counties for turkey harvest are Polk (170), Floyd (155), and Burke (153), and the top four public land tracts are the Chattahoochee National Forest (151), Paulding Forest WMA (38), Redlands WMA and Oconee National Forest (tied at 30). How has your turkey season gone so far? Has the action better or worse than last season? Feel free to discuss the results from your favorite WMA in the comments section below or in our Georgia Turkey Hunting Facebook group. Private Land Turkey…
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Apply Now for Georgia’s 2019 Quota Turkey Hunts

Apply Now for Georgia’s 2019 Quota Turkey Hunts

Georgia Turkey Hunting
Time is quickly running out to apply for one of Georgia’s 2019 turkey quota hunts. The deadline to apply is February 15. Forty-nine quota hunts are available on 25 of Georgia’s Wildlife Management Areas (See table below). Easiest Quota Turkey Hunts to Draw For the hunter without preference points, there are a few options available that should (based on the 2017 drawing) provide you with an opportunity to get in the field this spring, including: the Alapha River 2nd hunt, Big Lazer 3rd hunt, Chattahoochee Fall Line – Almo 2nd hunt, Chattahoochee Fall Line – Ft. Perry 2nd hunt, Chickasawhatchee 2nd and 3rd hunt, Griffin Ridge 3rd hunt, Joe Kurz 3rd hunt, Ocmulgee 2nd hunt, Rum Creek 2nd hunt, and the Silver Lake 2nd hunt. Most Difficult Quota Turkey Hunts…
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It’s Time to Stop Worrying About Genetics

It’s Time to Stop Worrying About Genetics

Georgia Deer Hunting
As deer hunters and managers, we seem to find an endless supply of things to concern ourselves with: when to hunt which stand, where to put our trail cameras, how our food plots are performing, and which deer the neighbors are shooting, to name a few. But here’s one thing you can mark off that list: genetics. Whitetail research has consistently shown that even under an extremely intensive buck culling program, you cannot manage the genetics of a wild, free-ranging deer herd. So there is no need to lose sleep over that spike buck you keep seeing or that 8-pointer with the messed up rack. For years, I followed along with the whole cull-buck train of thought because on the surface it seems to make perfect sense — if I…
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